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Tibetian medical paintings (17th century)

Created between 1687 and 1703, these paintings are pieces of educational art that interweave practical medical knowledge, depicting such things as the use of omens and dreams for making diagnoses.

As far as I understand it now, every picture depicts a certain dream that someone could have. And then they knew the meaning of this dream and give you advice or medicine that could make you feel better. I hope to find a book about it soon so I can read more.

medical tibetian
  • Bres magazine, March 1988

Sky burial is a funeral practice in which a human corpse is placed on a mountaintop to decompose while exposed to the elements or to be eaten by scavenging animals, especially carrion birds.

For Tibetan Buddhists, sky burial and cremation are templates of instructional teaching on the impermanence of life. Jhator is considered an act of generosity on the part of the deceased, since the deceased and his/her surviving relatives are providing food to sustain living beings.

death tibetian